When you are ready to purchase the most recent release of your graphic design or desktop publishing application to get the latest and greatest tools, make sure you know what you’re paying for. We’ve taken a look at some of the most popular titles and provided a list of reviews from around the Web. Before you head off to the computer store, find out if the upgrade is worth the price or whether you might want to wait until the next version.

  • Adobe Acrobat (convert-pdf-software-review)

    While many of the convert PDF software choices we reviewed have a specialty or a niche that they focus on, Adobe Acrobat X Pro focuses on everything. And it tops the competition in every area.

  • Adobe Illustrator (techradar.com)

    Illustrator remains hugely powerful, and a tool that is reliable, fast (as long as you have a good amount of RAM) and pretty much vital to any creative pro. The new pattern creation features are a joy to use, and the speed of this version alone will impress any daily user of the app.

  • Adobe InDesign (page-layout-software-review)

    Adobe InDesign CS6 is the first choice for many professional designers, publishers and artists. This page layout software makes it simple to combine text and graphics and lay them out on one page. The program has a preflight checklist, so you can keep tabs on everything you have done and need to do before you hit Print. You can see how different fonts look in the layout as well just by highlighting text and scrolling through the font list.

  • Adobe Photoshop (computershopper.com)

    With new editing tools, better automatic tweaks, and overall snappier performance, Photoshop CS6 is a welcome update that maintains the program’s position as the photo editor of choice for professionals and serious hobbyists alike.

  • QuarkXPress (creativepro.com)

    When an application as mature as QuarkXPress gets a new version number, you can expect a few big improvements and a whole lot of smaller ones. For big improvements in version 10, Quark chose to take on graphics display and handling, and a complete rewrite of their code for Mac OS X. Then they tackled a long list of user-requested smaller improvements, and added a few surprises.